ABOUT US

Salvage is a quarterly of revolutionary arts and letters. Salvage is edited and written by and for the desolated Left, by and for those committed to radical change, sick of capitalism and its sadisms, and sick too of the Left’s bad faith and bullshit. Salvage has earned its pessimism. Salvage yearns for that pessimism to be proved wrong. Salvage brings together the work of those who share a heartbroken, furious love of the world, and our rigorous principle: Hope is precious; it must be rationed. Salvage is committed to publishing the best radical essays, poems, art and fiction without sectarian, stylistic or formal constraint.

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Jewophobia

by Barnaby Raine The following is an extract from Salvage #6: Evidence of Things Not Seen. The issue is available for pre-order here, or as part of a subscription, available here. The rest of this essay will be released online after the print issue has been released, along with the rest of the non-fiction in the issue. Our poetry, fiction and art remains exclusive to the print edition. ** Measured analysis is out, polemics are all the rage. Consider this. A major study by the Institute for Jewish Policy Research finds anti-Semitic attitudes evenly spread across Britain’s political spectrum

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‘The Function of Autonomy’: Félix Guattari and New Revolutionary Prospects

by Andrew Ryder. Félix Guattari is widely discussed among philosophers, particularly feminists and specialists in ecology and technology. But in the Anglophone world, political organisers tend to ignore him. In part this is due to academic paywalls and university strictures confining his work, but the problem goes further: the stylistic conservatism of so much of the Anglo-American left has impeded the capacity to learn from his insights, because they are presented in an nontraditional and unfamiliar style. This resistance has obscured his continuing activity as a participant and organiser in a variety of international struggles.

Lebanon: a ruling class in perpetual crisis

by Elia El Khazen. On May 6th, citizens of Lebanon had the opportunity to vote in a general election for the first time in nine years. The timing of the 2018 parliamentary elections in Lebanon was no coincidence. It followed a near decade-long absence that saw parliament extend its own mandate by using security concerns as a justification for keeping the country under a de facto state of exception, allowing the ruling class to weather the Arab uprisings without any significant fragmentation of the historical bloc that has governed Lebanon for the last 14 years, while counter-revolutionary currents and anciens

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“The Architecture and Anatomy of Political Consciousness”: An Interview with Tithi Bhattacharya

Tithi Bhattacharya, interviewed by Jordy Rosenberg. Jordy Rosenberg: Since so many Salvage readers are in the UK, could you talk a bit about your how you see the West Virginia strike in relation to the UK strikes.  I know you’ve been in touch with comrades on both fronts, and I’m wondering if you’d like to discuss where you see points of overlap, and what kinds of salient differences you’ve found.

Jordy Rosenberg

Jordy Rosenberg is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He is the author of Confessions of the Fox (June 2018, Random House US/Canada; July 2018 Atlantic Books UK/AUS/NZ), as well as Critical Enthusiasm: Capital Accumulation and the Transformation of Religious Passion.  He is the co-editor of Queer Studies and the Crises of Capitalism, and The Dispossessed Eighteenth Century, and has published theory and fiction in Theory & Event, PMLA, Fence, Avidly, The Common, GLQ, World Picture Journal, and other places.

Pleasure and Provocation: Kay Gabriel Interview with Jordy Rosenberg

  by Jordy Rosenberg & Kay Gabriel. Jordy Rosenberg: Can you speak a bit about your formation as a poet and a Marxist?  You’ve founded (at least) two different poetry collectives – Negative Press, “a gay Marxist poetry collective,” and Vetch, a magazine of “trans poetry and poetics.”  How does your own work relate to the work of collectives-forming and the practice and labor of being part of a collective?

Kay Gabriel

Kay Gabriel is the author of the chapbooks Elegy Department Spring / Candy Sonnets 1 (BOAAT Press, 2017) and, with David W. Pritchard, Impropria Persona (Damask Press, 2017). She’s writing her dissertation at Princeton University on adaptations of Euripides in modernism and the avant-garde. Find her recent and forthcoming writing in the New Inquiry, Lambda Literary Poetry Spotlight, TSQ, Tripwire, the Believer, and elsewhere. Twitter: @unit01barbie

Alex Alvarez Taylor

Alex Alvarez Taylor holds an MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute, University of London. He lives and works in Spain, and is interested in the political aesthetics of the Frankfurt School.