Magpie Corvid

Magpie Corvid is a writer, activist and professional dominatrix based in the South West of the UK. She is a contributing editor of Salvage. She is a New Statesman blogger, and her writing also appears regularly in the Guardian, Cosmopolitan, and elsewhere. She writes on sex work, sexuality, gender, and many other issues, and tweets at @mistress_magpie.

    The Multitude of Fishes

    by Magpie Corvid

    Courtesy of Bob Bran
    Courtesy of Bob Bran

    In the grand chamber of the Plymouth Guildhall, in pride of place above the stage, hangs an exquisite Gobelin tapestry given by Napoleon III to Lord Clarendon. It depicts the Miraculous Draught of Fishes, a parable of a resurrected, unrecognised Christ advising his disciples, who had failed at fishing:

     ‘And [Christ] said unto them, Cast the net on the right side of the ship, and ye shall find. They cast therefore, and now they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes.’

    It is an apt tale for last Friday's sold-out rally for Islington North MP Jeremy Corbyn's campaign for the Labour leadership. Standing beneath that tapestry, his slight frame thrumming with an electric power drawn from the twelve hundred cheering supporters filling the Guildhall – here, in the birthplace of Michael Foot, in the very hall where the TUC voted to form the Labour Representation Committee in 1899, Corbyn seemed a fine fisher of men. But he has not caught us like fishes in his net. Instead, the people who are packing out halls in Plymouth and across the country – themselves just a fraction of the hundreds of thousands who are participating in, as he said in his speech, ‘the largest party processual election in UK history’ – have fished Corbyn out of obscurity, and have thrust him to the forefront of an unprecedented movement.

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    Marxism for Whores

    by Magpie Corvid

    My story is the same as many thousands of people who have found themselves unable to find steady, decently paid work.  Our story is about austerity; we are everywhere, subsisting on meagre benefits, part-time work and a few occasional jobs. Some of us go into business for ourselves; some of us make websites; some of us fix cars, and some of us do sex work.

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